Perry Anderson homeless alcoholic to sober Salvation Army soldier. Thanks to Jesus!

“Perry Anderson was near the brink of death when he first walked into Salvation Army hostel The Beacon. At 29, he had been battling alcohol addiction for more than a decade and had lost everything, including his marriage and home. “

This former carpenter had lost his job after a back injury. He drank and lost everything else. He nearly lost his life. Alcohol greatly aggravated his problems. Alcohol could not help him; only Jesus can give hope! Only Jesus gives meaning to life – even for people who never even started drinking.

But now at 20 months sober, Perry has become a Salvation Army soldier and is helping to rescue others from tampering with drink. Hallelujah!

Claire Tyrrell, 11 May 2018, The West Australian “Perry Anderson saved from alcohol addiction thanks to Salvation Army”

“Christians should set an example of personal responsibility in their daily lives. The Salvationist’s caring includes helping people for whom alcohol has been a problem. It would be inconsistent for any Salvationist to drink while at the same time seeking to help others to give it up. “

Salvation Army, Positional Statement on Social Drinking (1990)

“Mother” of the Salvation Army, Catherine Booth wisely warned against running into temptation to drink: “God has nowhere promised to keep the man who needlessly, and for the sake of his own indulgence, runs into temptation. How fearful, then, the responsibility of those Christians who tell the reclaimed inebriate, aye who tell any man, “You may safely tamper with the drink! You may play with this fire of hell, and trust in God to keep you from being burnt.” Alas, how do such counsellors unwittingly play the part of Satan in his cunning approaches to our Lord. “Cast thyself down, for it is written, He shall give His angels charge concerning thee; and in their hands they shall bear thee up, lest at any time thou dash thy foot against a stone.” [Matt. 4:6] Oh, that all our brethren and sisters would ever bear in mind the memorable answer, “Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God.” [Matt. 4:7]

Catherine Booth, Strong Drink Versus Christianity, Total Abstinence is a Valuable Ally of the Gospel, as a Conserving Power

“envy, murders, drunkenness, revelries, and the like; of which I tell you beforehand, just as I also told you in time past, that those who practice such things will not inherit the kingdom of God… Gal 6:1 Brethren, if a man is overtaken in any trespass, you who are spiritual restore such a one in a spirit of gentleness, considering yourself lest you also be tempted.” (Gal. 5:21; 6:1) (NKJV)

Nazarene A.M. Hills: we cannot consecrate alcohol to God

See also: Bible says be sober again and again.

Church of the Nazarene Manual – alcohol

A.M. Hills – early holiness preacher in the Church of the Nazarene. He wrote:

We can not consecrate our alcohol… to God.

I have two friends in Massachusetts, Brother M____ and Brother P_____.

They were at a holiness camp-meeting together. M_____ had already entered into the rest of perfect love. P_____ was seeking it. They were in the woods together in prayer, praying that P_____ might receive the Baptism with the Holy Ghost. After an hour of earnest consecrating, pleading prayer, P_____ began to shout at the top of his voice: “I’ll do it!

I’ll do it!” and the blessing came. M_____, by his side, was entirely ignorant of what it was that the Spirit wanted. But P_____ was a general merchant and among other things sold tobacco, and the sticking point was — whether he would give up selling tobacco. He immediately telegraphed to his clerks to sell no more tobacco. He took three hundred dollars worth out into the street, when he reached home, and made a bon-fire and burned it up. Obedience to the Spirit! I have never known a person to receive this blessing who used or sold tobacco. It is too vile to be tolerated by the Spirit in a body which he proposes to make a temple of the Holy Ghost.

Whatever in habit or life the Holy Spirit condemns must be abandoned in the spirit of implicit obedience or it is useless to seek this sanctifying work of the Holy Ghost in the heart. No agony of prayer can reach it while the will is not joyfully obedient.

We can not consecrate our alcohol, or our tobacco, or our opium, or our card-playing, or dancing, or theater-going to God. He wants none of these things. All actual and known sins must be abandoned, at conversion. Our consecration is for a deeper work, that is to say, for the removal of inbred sin, which, after all, is not accomplished by our consecration though that is an essential preliminary, but by the ‘Baptism with the Holy Ghost and fire.’

A.M. Hills (Church of the Nazarene), How to Obtain the Blessing 

http://www.godrules.net/library/hills/192hills_b4.htm

No sinners want to see Jesus come

(8) “They were examples to all that believe in Macedonia.” (vs. 7) [1 Thess. 1:7] This is no description of unbelievers. (9) “For from you hath sounded forth the word of the Lord,” through all Achaia, and every place. They must have been, then, a most earnest and aggressive body of believers. (10) They had “joy of the Holy Spirit.” (vs. 6.) No sinner ever had that, or ever will. (11) They had “turned unto God from idols to serve a living and true God.” (vs. 9) Oh, what grand churches we should have today, if all the members would abandon their idols — tobacco, lodges, cards, theatres, dancing, avarice, selfishness and unhallowed lusts, and serve the living God with all their heart. But that is the very kind of Christians these Thessalonians were. (12) “They were waiting for Jesus from heaven.” (vs. 10.) No sinners want to see Jesus come; that is the last thing any of them desire.

A.M. Hills (Church of the Nazarene), Sermon 9, The Second Blessing in Experience, in Theology, and in the Bible 1 Thessalonians 5:23: “And the God of peace himself sanctify you wholly.”

http://www.godrules.net/library/hills/192hills_a11.htm

3+ million die from alcohol per year – says World Health Organization

More than 3 million people died as a result of harmful use of alcohol in 2016, according a report released by the World Health Organization (WHO) today. This represents 1 in 20 deaths. More than three quarters of these deaths were among men. Overall, the harmful use of alcohol causes more than 5% of the global disease burden.

WHO’s Global status report on alcohol and health 2018 presents a comprehensive picture of alcohol consumption and the disease burden attributable to alcohol worldwide. It also describes what countries are doing to reduce this burden.

World Health Organization, News Release 21 Sep. 2018, “Harmful use of alcohol kills more than 3 million people each year, most of them men

Grape juice already called YAYIN (wine) in the press!

יין Yayin did not first become “wine” only if it fermented later, after it was pressed. Both simple grape juice and intoxicating juice were called yayin in the original Hebrew of the Old Testament.

(Both were called οινος oinos in the original Greek of the New Testament.)

See also: Shekhar – meaning sweet drink or strong drink in Bible? (Deut 14:26)

(And: broad meaning of wine (yayin) – documented.)

Nobody is denying yayin was intoxicating (sometimes anyway). Nobody is denying that “{yayin} wine is a mocker…” (Prov. 20:1) Indeed, Levitical priests who drank at all in God’s house were even threatened with capital punishment.* With clear minds, they could distinguish between the holy and the unholy (Lev. 10:9).

*Now unrepentant persons are put away from church membership, that is all. (1 Cor 5:2,9-13) Unless they repent of “envy, drunkenness, orgies, and things like these,” they will not inherit the kingdom of God! (Gal. 5:21)

But here see for yourself where YAYIN was NOT always intoxicating…

Continue reading “Grape juice already called YAYIN (wine) in the press!”

Churches know boozy events exclude real men

I remember listening to a real man’s concerns who had acknowledged to me that he had become addicted to alcohol.He already wanted to quit drinking. He told me that he no longer even goes to the Christmas celebrations of his relatives. That is because he knows that alcohol would be present. He knows that if he attends, then he will resume his old drinking ways again. So he does not attend. But he feels excluded at most places (besides Alcoholics Anonymous meetings).

Then I asked myself – should a church (consciously or not) make others like him feel somehow excluded from any of its events in the same way?
The man is already self-conscious about this matter. Now should he have to blow a trumpet everywhere that he goes and announce: Hear ye, Hear ye, I am hopelessly addicted? I hope not! But deliberately or not, he is still made to feel unwelcome since he now wants to escape his old ways. Rather, he should be supported that he already wants to quit. Let us “bear one another’s burdens” and let me beware myself too. I must consider myself, lest I also be tempted by it.

“envy, murders, drunkenness, revelries, and the like; of which I tell you beforehand, just as I also told you in time past, that those who practice such things will not inherit the kingdom of God….

Brethren, if a man is overtaken in any trespass, you who are spiritual restore such a one in a spirit of gentleness, considering yourself lest you also be tempted. Bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.”

(Galatians 5:21; 6:1-2)

We are not of the night nor of darkness. I do hope all will agree that church events without any alcohol are never the worse because they are without it.

“The harp and the strings, The tambourine and flute, And wine are in their feasts; But they do not regard the work of the LORD, Nor consider the operation of His hands. Therefore my people have gone into captivity, Because they have no knowledge; Their honorable men are famished, And their multitude dried up with thirst.”

(Isaiah 5:12-13)

FALSE: Jesus fails responsible serving of alcohol license?!

See: Bible says be sober again and again

3 But I am afraid that as the serpent deceived Eve by his cunning, your thoughts will be led astray from a sincere and pure devotion to Christ.
4 For if someone comes and proclaims another Jesus than the one we proclaimed, or if you receive a different spirit from the one you received, or if you accept a different gospel from the one you accepted, you put up with it readily enough.”

(2 Corinthians 11:3-4)

Re: “How did Jesus celebrate? With Sam Chan.” The event description says: “Did you know Jesus was accused of partying too hard?” The same event description is repeated from an earlier message of Sam Chan (4 Feb. 2018). I quote his very deceiving and shameful statements about another Jesus (supposedly) getting people drunk (and very drunk):

Continue reading “FALSE: Jesus fails responsible serving of alcohol license?!”

Nephalism – teetotalism in Bible and Greek usage

Nephalism definition

Nephalism: teetotalism; total abstinence from consuming alcohol.

Nephalism: “total abstinence from alcoholic beverages” (Miriam-Webster Dictionary)

History and Etymology for nephalism: Middle Greek nēphalismos soberness, from Greek nēphalios sober (from nēphein to be sober, drink no wine) (Miriam-Webster Dictionary)

This term is of Greek origin, and found in Scripture.

Nephō: “to be free from the influence of intoxicants.” (Vine’s Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words)

Nēphaleos: “of drink, unmixed with wine… sober … of persons” (Liddell and Scott Lexicon)

Nephalism examples in Scripture (Greek New Testament)

1 Cor 15:32 If I fought with animals at Ephesus for human purposes, what does it profit me? If the dead are not raised, then “let’s eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.” [Isa. 22:13]
1 Cor 15:33 Don’t be deceived! “Evil companionships corrupt good morals.”
1 Cor 15:34 {Eknēpsate} Get sober righteously, and don’t sin, for some have no knowledge of God. I say this to your shame.

1 Thess 5:6 so then let’s not sleep, as the rest do, but let’s watch and {nēphōmen} let’s be sober.
1 Thess 5:7  For those getting sleepy, sleep in the night; and those getting drunk are drunk in the night.
1 Thess 5:8 But since we belong to the day, {nēphōmen} let’s be sober, putting on the breastplate of faith and love, and for a helmet, the hope of salvation.

1 Tim 3:2 The overseer therefore must be without reproach, the husband of one wife, {nēphalion} sober, sensible, modest, hospitable, good at teaching;
1 Tim 3:3 not around-wine, not violent, not greedy for money, but gentle, not quarrelsome, not covetous
Likewise the the deacons have regard for no more wine. (See 1 Tim. 3:8.)
Deaconesses: likewise these women must be “reverent, not slanderers, {nēphalious} sober, faithful in all things” (1 Tim. 3:11)

2 Tim 2:25 in gentleness correcting those who oppose him: perhaps God may give them repentance leading to a full knowledge of the truth,
2 Tim 2:26 and {ananēpsōsin} they can again sober up out of the devil’s snare, having been taken captive by him to his will.

2 Tim 4:5 But you {nēphe} be sober in all things, suffer hardship, do the work of an evangelist, and fulfill your ministry.

Male presbyters: “Old men must be {nēphalious} sober…” (Tit. 2:2) Likewise female presbyters must be controlled by no more wine, and be good teachers. (See Tit. 2:3). Teach the young people to be sensible.

1 Pet 1:13 Therefore each prepare your mind for action: {nēphontes} be sober, perfectly, set your hope on the grace that will be brought to you at the revelation of Jesus Christ—
1 Pet 1:14 as children of obedience, not conforming yourselves according to your former lusts as in your ignorance,
1 Pet 1:15 but just as he who called you is holy, you yourselves also be holy in all of your behavior

1 Pet 4:1 Therefore, since Christ suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves also with the same mind; for he who has suffered in the flesh has ceased from sin,
1 Pet 4:2 that you no longer should live the rest of your time in the flesh for the lusts of men, but for the will of God.
1 Pet 4:3 For we have spent enough of our past time doing the desire of the Gentiles, and having walked in lewdness, lusts, drunken binges, orgies, parties, and abominable idolatries.
1 Pet 4:4 They think it strange – because you don’t run together into their own un-saved outburst – maligning you.

1 Pet 4:7 But the end of all things is near. Therefore be sensible, and {nēpsate} be sober in prayers.

1 Pet 5:8 {Nēpsate} Be sober! Be watchful! Your adversary, the devil, walks around like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour.

Other examples of “Nephalism”

“The leavings of the caterpillar the grasshopper has devoured,
and the leavings of the grasshopper the locust larva has devoured,
and the leavings of the locust larva the rust has devoured.
{Eknēpsate} Sober up, drunkards, from their wine and weep;
wail, all you who drink wine unto intoxication…” (Joel 1:4-5, New English Translation of the Septuagint) Of course this same word in 1 Cor. 15:34 cannot be translated as merely reduce your drinking, o drunkards.

Greek historian Xenophon (Cyropaedia 7.5) said Cyrus gave a pep talk to his soldiers shortly before the great Babylonian Chaldean Empire was successfully overthrown (539 B.C.):

“we are now to march are the same men that we have repeatedly defeated, and that, too, when they were all drawn up in battle line with their allies at their side, and when they were all wide awake and {nēphontas} sober and fully armed; whereas now we are going to fall upon them at a time when many of them are asleep, many drunk, and none of them in battle array. And when they find out that we are inside the walls, in their panic fright they will be much more helpless still than they are now.”

“Then Noe {exenēpsen} sobered up from the wine…” (Gen. 9:24, New English Translation of the Septuagint) Noe = Noah.

“And it happened in the morning, when Nabal had {exenēpsen} sobered up from the wine…” (1 Sam 25:37, New English Translation of the Septuagint)

In Lamentations (Septuagint – Lam. 2:18; 3:49), somebody’s tears won’t run {eknēpsin} “dry”. In a similar way the English term “dry” sometimes describes places where alcohol is prohibited, and sometimes it means lacking moisture.

“After this the soul goes on to deny that it drinks wine or strong drink, boasting in its being continually {nēphein} sober throughout the whole of its life. For to have the reasoning powers really free, and unfettered, and pure, and intoxicated by no passion, was really a very important and admirable thing.” (Philo, Drunkenness, 37, 151, translated by Charles Duke Yonge from Greek)

“He also enjoined them, not only to observe purity in their sacred ministrations, but in their daily conversation, that it might be unblamable also. And on this account it is that those who wear the sacerdotal garments are without spot [Compare 2 Pet. 3:14], and eminent for their purity and {nēphalioi} sobriety [Compare 1 Pet. 1:13; 4:7; 5:8]: nor are they permitted to drink wine so long as they wear those garments [Compare Rev. 7:13-14]. Moreover, they offer sacrifices that are entire, and have no defect whatsoever.” (Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews, 3.12.2 (278-279), translated by William Whiston from Greek)

Josephus was commenting about priests who were — under great penalty — required to be sober wearing the sacerdotal garments: “Do not drink wine or intoxicating drink, you, nor your sons with you, when you go into the tabernacle of meeting, lest you die. It shall be a statute forever throughout your generations, that you may distinguish between holy and unholy, and between unclean and clean, and that you may teach the children of Israel all the statutes which the LORD has spoken to them by the hand of Moses.” (Lev. 10:9-11)

Greek word forms

G366: ἀνανήφω, ἀνανήψωσιν, ανανήψωσιν, ἀνανήφει.

G1594: ἐκνήφω , ἐκνήψατε, εκνηψουσιν, εκνηψιν, εκνηψον, εξενηψεν.

G3524: νηφάλεος, νηφαλέος, νηφάλιος, νηφάλιον, νηφαλίους.

G3525: νήφω, νήφωμεν, νῆφε, νήφοντες, νήψατε,
νῆψις.

English word forms

nephalism

nephalist

nephalistic

nepsis

Increase drinking age to save lives says Australian Medical Association

“…every day we see the devastating results in emergency departments” AMA Queensland President Dr Chris Zappala said.

Trading Hour Push Ahead of Summer Drinks Toll, Australian Medical Association Queensland Media Release 2015.

In 2009, Australian Medical Association Queensland president Dr Mason Stevenson said the surge in teenage binge drinking has worrying implications for Australia, as that generation carries their bad drinking habits into adulthood.
“We are going to expect a substantially increased rate of alcoholism,” he said.
Prompted by such concerns, one Queensland school – St Edmund’s College in Ipswich – is proposing to randomly breath-test students arriving at the school dance.
Mason suggests an even more radical intervention. “There is a cogent argument for increasing the legal age of drinking in Australia from 18 to 21,” he said. “You also as a result of that policy would save 100 Australian lives every year and an extra 1000 from severe maiming and permanent injury.
“On medical grounds, it’s a no-brainer.”

Melanie Christiansen, “Queensland’s serious alcohol problem revealed”, The Courier-Mail, October 17, 2009

Aboriginal Elder Joe Brown calling for total grog ban at Kurnangki

‘Aboriginal elder Joe Brown, 63, a leader of Kurnangki, one of three communities bordering the town centre, said children as young as 12 were into drugs and alcohol.

“We should have a total grog ban,” he said.

Mr Brown, whose 25-year-old son committed suicide last year, said he did not want the army brought in to WA but supported extending to the state the total alcohol bans being proposed in the territory.

Marra Worra Worra Aboriginal Corporation chairman Ivan McPhee, an elder, said the situation in the town was getting worse. He wants tougher alcohol restrictions, including a total ban on takeaway sales, and says the issues are the same as those confronting most of the Kimberley.

“Our kids are going out of control, wandering around with no jobs,” he said. “We are losing a lot of young people to alcohol and drugs. We never heard anything about hanging until drugs and alcohol came.

“We are having a funeral every day. A lot of people are talking about (child sex abuse). We are hearing things about rape.”’

Jessica Strutt, ‘Elders call for more alcohol bans’, The Age, 14 July 2007.

Thank Christ for sober aboriginal ladies!

58.2 % of indigenous women (aged 18+) do not drink alcohol. Thank God these women had never consumed alcohol (or at least not within a week of the survey).

‘In 2004–05, Indigenous people aged 18 years and over were more likely than non-Indigenous people to abstain from drinking alcohol.’

The Health and Welfare of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, 2008, Ch. 8, Health Risk Factors, p. 141-142.

‘Women may be abstainers for a variety of reasons. Christianity is frequently a reason proffered by Aboriginal women to explain their non-drinking status, and they form the core of participants in the variety of Christian churches and movements across Aboriginal Australia. At Yalata in South Australia, for example, a new Aboriginal-controlled Christian movement provoked many drinkers to stop their alcohol use and gave encouragement to women non-drinkers in their efforts to curb the importation of alcohol into the community (Brady & Palmer 1988). The adoption of the perceived ‘Christian life’ is a way in which Aboriginal people may legitimise their abandonment of drinking (cf. Neich & Park 1988).
Other women say that they cannot drink because they have to care for their families, or even for their drinking husbands. Evidence given to the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody in 1988 suggested that whereas Aboriginal men had ‘learned’ their drinking habits from the hard, binge-drinking white stockmen, Aboriginal women encountered, or worked for, white women who were mainly missionaries’ or pastoralists’ wives, who tended not to drink alcohol (Alice Springs hearings, 7 October 1988, Dr C. Watson).
Women (and men) may give up drinking because of repeated encounters with gaol and the police (cf. Laurie & McGrath 1985)’

Alcohol Use and Its Effects Upon Aboriginal Women, Maggie Brady Visiting Research Fellow, Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies Canberra, Australian Capital Territory