How Graham Kerr quit cooking with alcohol

Graham Kerr, celebrity TV chef of the 1970s. Before his conversion to Christ, he was previously known for crude jokes, cooking with alcohol and constantly guzzling it too. But then in 1975 he became a New Creation, and what a difference!

“He became famous for his one show, the ‘Galloping Gourmet.’ 455 episodes were filmed in all.” (Cooks Info – Graham Kerr)

Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new.” (2 Corinthians 5:17)

Here is the new Graham Kerr in his own words…

“One day, very early in our walk with the Lord, I stood at our bedside and spoke these exact words, ‘The true face of satan is the compromiser.’

I am now, this day, confessing to you that I almost allowed my self to win on a matter that could have effectively compromised this book. I have shared my views on the consumption of alcohol with you, but what of the use of alcohol, in cooking?

My ‘second nature’ has been telling me that wine is a vitally important seasoning. Its sheer aromatic

power is justification alone for its use.

But!

What of the pressures created in the heart and mind of one who has been persuaded that alcohol is of the devil, and one needs little persuasion to see the devil’s work in the manner in which this substance can be used.

What of this person who is torn, who is in two minds now that he or she reads of this seasoning in a book written for the express purpose of loving God?

Is this then a ‘Holy Invitation’ to purchase and to handle a product that the purchaser would otherwise think of as like patting a wild dog?

I believe it is and I further believe that any use of any kind of alcoholic beverage by me in my work is an invitation to you to compromise.

Therefore l now renounce the use of any form of alcohol in my professional culinary life and in the name of Jesus I pray that all uses made of alcoholic beverages that I have recommended in either the ‘Galloping Gourmet’ series or in ‘Take Kerr’ or in any book, magazine or radio program, be now from the minds of those who might otherwise be temp­ted to bring such substances into their homes under this culinary compromise. I believe that the first step toward evil is the worst step and that every ounce of determination and effort is needed to rebuke it then…

So it is for the man or woman who has recognized alcohol as a fear or demon in his or her life. It isn’t the temptation of the poured glass of sparkling wine set before you that you pray you can turn from. NO! It’s that act of habit in passing a liquor store, in reading a gourmet magazine, in scanning a wine list. In reading one of my recipes!

Now, Satan will use any of these devices to get you on his escalator, his moving highway that always leads downhill to that actual moment of temptation. Because of this I’m not going to risk your or my utter joy in the Lord trough a simple act of compro­mise …”

“I be­lieve it was unfermented grape juice [in Miracle at Cana] because God would have never taken that first step toward evil in making from water a potent substance capable of being used by Satan.

Therefore I believe Jesus turned water into unfermented, fresh, pure new wine.”

(Graham Kerr, 1978, ‘The New Seasoning’, p. 35-37)

Graham Kerr gives alternatives for us cooking without alcohol …

“NE W WINE RECIPIES

We used, for our tests, Welch’s White and Red Grape Juices. These are bottled pure grape juices and do not need reconstitution.

We are sure that there must be many other com­panies that process what we call new wine (non-alcoholic grape juice), but we are equally certain that the degree of natural sweetness will differ in each case; therefore we use this name only as a base for our recipe measurements and not as an endorsement of its superior qualities.

NEW WHITE COOKING WINE

This can be used in place of dry white wine called for in recipe books.

1/2 cup (4 fl. oz.) white grape juice

1 tsp. rice vinegar

Combine and use immediately.

NEW RED COOKING WINE

Use in lieu of red wines called for in recipe books.

1/2 cup (4 fl. oz.) red (or purple) grape juice

1 tbsp. strong cold tea

1 tbsp. rice vinegar

Combine and use immediately.

You will find that I separate the grape juice and tea from the vinegar in some recipes for specific effects.”

(Graham Kerr, 1978, ‘The New Seasoning’, p. 252)

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